Tagged: camera grip

Seeking Another Change

Just as the dogwood blooms again each spring, I seem to also be going through a change … finding a camera or lens that suits my ever-changing situation.  As I mentioned earlier, I have gotten frustrated with the ergonomics of my Panasonic G3.  It seems that I end up accidentally pushing buttons and changing my settings far too often.

Seeking a solution and trying to best utilize my micro 4/3 lenses; I pre-ordered the Olympus OM-D E-M5 camera … and then canceled the order a few days later.  The price seemed too steep for just trying something with IQ not much (if any) better than my G3.  I have also been carefully reading reviews and comments on the E-M5 and I have noted that others have had problems with its buttons being too small and awkwardly placed.

I’m still not sure whether to replace the G3, or with what, but I took another tack and got the Nikon D5100 DSLR.  It is lighter than my K-5 was and I hoped that would make enough of a difference that I could use it with a lightweight prime lens, but it didn’t.  I had to send it back; but, I did learn more about my situation relative to being able to handle cameras.

I have arthritis in my hands and my thumb joints are particularly bad.  I found that it isn’t just the camera weight that causes me problems.  It is also a function of how far I need to bend my thumb back.  DSLRs, like the Nikon D5100, have a pretty good grip to hold onto but it is deep and they tend to bend my thumb back farther than I am comfortable with.  The additional camera weight also requires that I hold on more tightly and the combination of the force and the bent-back angle are too much for my hands.  My days of using a conventional DSLR with a mirror are over.

I am now back to trying to find a mirror-less camera that is lighter, has an appropriate back-to-front thickness and sufficient room for my hand without accidentally pushing buttons and changing the settings when I don’t want to change them.